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Waimea Canyon
Hawaiian Waterfalls
Mauna Kea, Hawaii
Haleakala Crater
Mount Waialeale
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Mount Waialeale  
Kauai, Hawaiian Islands
Helicopter Tour of Kauai Island, Hawaii
Earth's Natural Wonders in Australia & Oceania
 
Height of Mount Waialeale: 5,148 feet (1,569 m)
Averge annual rainfall: 460 inches (1,168 cm)
Meaning "rippling waters." Wettest spot on earth, average of about 450 inches of rain per year. Couldn't see the summit which was in the clouds. Kaua'i June 2008.
Helicopter Tour of Kauai Island, Hawaii[1]

Mount Wai'ale'ale (pronounced wai uh-lay uh-lay), elevation 5,148 ft (1,569 m), is the second highest point on the island of Kauai in the Hawaiian Islands. Averaging more than 460 inches (11,680 mm) of rain over the last 32 years, with a record 683 inches (17,340 mm) in 1982, its summit is considered one of the rainiest spots on earth. It has been promoted in tourist literature for many years as the wettest spot, although the 38-year average at Mawsynram, India is 11,873 mm (467.4 inches). However, Mawsynram's rainfall is concentrated in the monsoon season, while the rain at Waialeale is more evenly distributed through the year.[2]

   
Wai'ale'ale Lake or Rippling Waters
The cone of Mount Waialeale is nestled into the island's central massif, and bears mute testimony to the upheaval of its birth. Waialeale is one of the world's wettest mountains. An annual average of 160 inches of rain falls on its flanks.Only well adapted plants such as mosses, sedges, and grasses, thrive on this high-altitude, sunlight deprived, wet, and windy mountain.An annual average of 160 inches of rain falls on its flanks. in 1982 a record rainfall of 666 inches fell at its peak, while 10 inches fell at the coast.
Wai'ale'ale Lake or Rippling Waters[3]  

Several factors give the summit of Waialeale more potential to create precipitation than the rest of the island chain:

Its northern position relative to the main Hawaiian Islands provides more exposure to frontal systems that bring rain during the winter.
It has a relatively round and regular conical shape, exposing all sides of its peak to winds and the moisture that they carry.
Its peak lies just below the so-called trade wind inversion layer of 6,000 feet (1,800 m), above which trade-wind-produced clouds cannot rise.
And most importantly, the steep cliffs cause the moisture-laden air to rise rapidly - over 3,000 ft (1,000 m) in less than half a mile - and drop a large portion of its rain in one spot, as opposed to spreading the rain out over a larger area if the slope were more gradual.
The great rainfall in the area produces the Alakai Wilderness Area, a large boggy area that is home to many rare plants. The ground is so wet that although trails exist, access by foot to the Waialeale area is extremely difficult.[2]

Meaning "rippling waters." Wettest spot on earth, average of about 450 inches of rain per year. Couldn't see the summit which was in the clouds. Kaua'i June 2008.

 

twilekjedi
June 30, 2008

 

The oldest and fourth largest of the Hawaiian Islands, Kauai is the center of this south-southwest-looking, low-oblique photograph.
Kauai lies 105 miles (170 kilometers) northwest of Honolulu across the Kauai Channel. Of volcanic origin, the highest point on the mountainous island is Mount Waialeale at the center of the island [5148 feet (1570 meters) above sea level]. Soils on Kauai are very fertile, particularly on the north part of the island where pineapple, rice, and sugarcane are grown; ranching is also an important agricultural industry. The wettest spot on Earth, with an annual average of 460 inches (11 648 millimeters), is located just east of Mount Waialeale. The high annual rainfall has eroded deep valleys in Kauai’s central mountains, carving out canyons with many scenic waterfalls. The city of Lihue, on the island’s southeast side, is the seat of Kauai County and the main city on the island. Waimea, on the island’s southwest side and once the capital of Kauai, was the first place visited by explorer Captain James Cook in 1778.
The city is at the head of one of the most famous and scenic canyons in the world, Waimea, whose gorge is 3000 feet (9144 meters) deep. The northeastern tip of the island of Niihau is visible near the southwest corner of the photograph. [4]

 

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References
 
1.Flickr-Kauai Island, Hawaii-Creative Commons Attribution License -retrieved 6/19/2009
2.Wikipedia-Mount Wai'ale'ale-retrieved 6/19/2009
3.Wikipedia-Mount Wai'ale'ale-retrieved 6/19/2009
4.NASA-Credit to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Science@NASA .-retrieved 6/19/2009
 
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