Home Asia Europe North America Polar Regions South America Africa Australia
English
Italian
Korean
Chinese (Simplified)
Chinese (Traditionnal
Portuguese
German
French
Spanish
Japanese
Arabic
Russian
Greek
Dutch
Bulgarian
Czech
Croat
Danish
Finnish
Hindi
Polish
Romanian
Swedish
Norwegian
Catalan
Filipino
Hebrew
Indonesian
Latvian
Lithuanian
Serbian
Slovak
Slovenia
Ukrainian
Vietnamese
Albanian
Estonian
Galician
Maltese
Thai
Turkish
Hungarian

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Asia Natural Wonders
Taymyr Peninsula
Northern Steppe
Sea of Okhotsk
Tyulenii Island
Kamchatka
The Valley of the Geysers
Lake Baikal
Yankicha--Kuril Islands
Aral Sea
Singing Sands
 

 

 

 

Yangtze Gorges
Chongoing, China
Earth's Natural Wonders in Asia
Length of Qutang Gorge: 5 m (8km)
Length of Wu Gorge: 25 m (40km)
Length of Xiling Gorge: 47 mi. (75 km)
The upper course of the Yangtze flows across the Plateau of Tibet and descends through deep valleys in the mountains east of the plateau, emerging onto the Yunnan-Guizhou (Yungui) Plateau. Summers there are warm, and the winters are cold. he source of the Yangtze is the Ulan Moron (Wulanmulun) River, which originates in glacial meltwaters on the slopes of the Tanggula Mountains in southern Qinghai province on the border with the Tibet Autonomous Region.[4]
Yangtze Gorges [1]

 

Three Gorges Region

The Three Gorges region is a scenic area along the Yangtze River in the Hubei province of the People's Republic of China with a total length of approximately 200 km. The Three Gorges occupy approximately 120 km within this region. Although it is primarily famous for its scenery, the Three Gorges region is historically and culturally an important region in China. A representation of the westernmost gorge appears on China's currency, the back of the paper 5 yuan note.

Three Gorges Dam

The Three Gorges Dam was constructed at a place called Sandòupíng in the middle of the Xiling Gorge. The reservoir was completed in the summer of 2006, and the water level in the Qutang, Wuxia, and the western portion of the Xiling Gorges has already begun to rise. The dam itself is projected to be completed in 2009. In addition to the impacts of the dam on the ecology and people (i.e. the mass relocation of towns and villages) of the region, the dam will also change the scenery of the Three Gorges. Because the water level will be higher, the river will be wider and the mountains will appear lower. Proponents of the dam point out that because the mountains reach several thousand feet above the river, the gorges are still likely to offer spectacular views of the surrounding cliffs, and it should be noted that most riverboat companies that operate in the Three Gorges intend to continue to offer tours of the region. The increase in width of the Gorges will also allow larger ships through the gorges, and it is anticipated that river traffic of all kinds will increase.

Yangtze River

The Yangtze River, or Chang Jiang , Tibetan: 'Bri-chu, is the longest river in China and Asia, and the third-longest in the world, after the Nile in Africa and the Amazon in South America.

The river is about 6,385 km long (3915 mi) and flows from its source in Qinghai Province, eastwards into the East China Sea at Shanghai. It acts as a dividing line between North and South China, although geographers generally consider the Qinling-Huai River line to be the official line of geographical division. As the largest river in the region, the Yangtze is historically, culturally, and economically important to China. One of the dams on the river, the Three Gorges Dam, is the largest hydro-electric power station in the world. The section of the river flowing through deep gorges in Yunnan province is part of the Three Parallel Rivers of Yunnan Protected Areas: a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The name Yangtze River, as well as various similar names such as Yangtse River, Yangzi River, Yangtze Kiang, etc., is derived from Yangzi Jiang , which, beginning in the Sui Dynasty, was the Chinese name for the river in its lower reaches, specifically, the stretch between Yangzhou and Zhenjiang . The name comes from the ancient ferry crossing Yangzi Jin ( meaning "Yangzi Crossing"). From the Ming Dynasty, the name was sometimes written (yángzi). Because it was the name first heard by missionaries and traders, this name was applied in English to the whole river. In Chinese, Yangzi Jiang is considered a historical or poetic name for the river. The modern Chinese name, Chang Jiang ( Cháng Jiang), literally means "long 'Jiang'" (Jiang is the classical Chinese of Yangtze, but now it means river) and may sometimes also be used in English. It is also known to many as the 'Main Street' of China.

Like many rivers, the river is known by different names over its course. At its source, it is called in Chinese the Dangqu ( from the Tibetan for "marsh river"). Downstream, it is called the Tuotuo River and then the Tongtian River ( literally "river passing through heaven"). Where it runs through deep gorges parallel to the Mekong and the Salween before emerging onto the plains of Sichuan, it is known as the Jinsha River , literally "golden sands river").


The first turn of the Yangtze at Shigu , Yunnan Province, where the river turns 180 degrees from south- to north-bound.
The Yangtze was earlier known to the Chinese as simply Jiang , which has become a generic name meaning "river", or the Da Jiang . The Tibetan name for the river is Drichu . The Yangtze is sometimes referred to as the Golden Waterway.

 

 

Discoveryangtze
August 22, 2007

The World Wonders .Com-visit 1,000 world wonders at www.theworldwonders.com

 

 
 
African
American
Asian
European
Oceanian
Others
 
   
 
   
28 finalists-7 winners will be announced in 2011

 

References
 
1. Flickr-Yangtze Gorges- Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 8/11/2009
2. Wikipedia-Yangtze Gorges-retrieved 8/11/2009
3. Wikipedia- Yangtze River-retrieved 8/11/2009
4. "Yangtze River." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica 2009 Deluxe Edition. Chicago: Encyclopædia Britannica, 2009.
 
 
 Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  Link to this site---Terms of Service---Privacy policy---Contact Us

free web stats