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Asia Natural Wonders
Taymyr Peninsula
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Taymyr Peninsula, Russia

The Waterfall-Taimyr Pennisula [1]

Earth's Natural Wonders in Asia
 
 
Area of Lake Taymyr: 2700 Square miles (6, 990 sq. km)
Width of Siberian Tundra: 2,000 miles (3,200 km)
Height of Byrranga Plateau: 5,000 feet (1,500 m)
 


Taymyr Peninsula or Taimyr Peninsula , northernmost projection of Siberia, N Krasnoyarsk Territory, N central Siberian Russia, between the estuaries of the Yenisei and Khatanga rivers and extending into the Arctic Ocean. Cape Chelyuskin at the tip of the peninsula is the northernmost point of the Asian mainland. The peninsula, covered mostly with tundra and drained by the Taymyra River, was formerly most of the Taymyr Autonomous Area, 332,857 sq mi (862,100 sq km); the region also included the islands between the Yenisei and Khatanga gulfs, the northern parts of the Central Siberian Plateau, and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago. The capital was Dudinka . The economy of the area depends on mineral and oil extraction, fishing, and dairy and fur farming as well as such traditional activities as reindeer raising and trapping. Formed in 1930, the autonomous area was merged into Krasnoyarsk Territory in 2007.[2]

Taymyr Peninsula is a peninsula in Siberia that forms the most northern part of mainland Asia. It lies between the Yenisei Gulf of the Kara Sea and the Khatanga Gulf of the Laptev Sea in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. Lake Taymyr and the Byrranga Mountains are located within the vast Taymyr Peninsula. The peninsula is the site of the last known naturally occurring muskox outside of North America, which died out about 2,000 years ago They were successfully reintroduced in 1975. Cape Chelyuskin, the northernmost point of the Eurasian continent, is located at the northern end of the Taymyr Peninsula. The coasts of the Taymyr Peninsula are frozen most of the year; between September and June on average. The summer season is short, especially in its northeastern shores (Laptev Sea). The climate in the interior of the peninsula is continental. Winters are harsh, with frequent blizzards and extremely low temperatures.[4]

Lake Taymyr is a lake of the central regions of the Taymyr Peninsula in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russian Federation. It is located south of the Byrranga Mountains. Lake Taymyr is large, with a length of 165 km roughly east-to-west. It has an irregular shape with many arms projecting in different directions that cover a wide region. Its maximum width, however, is only about 23 km in its broadest area which is towards the eastern end of the lake. Lake Taymyr is covered with ice from late September until June. The main river flowing into its basin is the Upper Taymyra, which flows into the lake from the west; other rivers flowing into it are the Zapadnaya, Severnaya, Bikada Nguoma, Yamutarida and Kalamissamo. The Lower Taymyra River flows out of the lake northwards across the Byrranga mountain region. The tundra areas south of Lake Taymyr are full of smaller lakes and marshes. There are two quite large lakes towards the east.[3]

 

Putorana plateau is located beyond the Polar circle in Russian Siberia next to Taymyr peninsula. It is a surrealistic uninhabited world of untouched wild

You tube video

 

traveller993
December 10, 2007

The World Wonders .Com-visit 1,000 world wonders at www.theworldwonders.com

 

 
 
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References
 
1. Waterfall-Taymyr Pennisula-retrieved 6/14/09
2. High Beam Encyclopedia-retrieved 6/14/09
3. Wikipedia-Lakke Taymyr-retrieved 7/14/2009
4. Wikipedia-Taymyr Pennisula-retrieved 7/14/2009
 
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