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Ranthambore National Park
Rajasthan, India
Earth's Natural Wonders in Asia
 
Area of park-151,000 sq. mi. (392 sq. km.)
Number of recorded bird species-272
 
During the past few years, there has been a decline in tiger population in Ranthambore due to [poaching] and other reasons. However there were some tigers who succeeded in carrying on their genes even in such circumstances. A tigress known as "Lady of the lakes" separated from her mother at a very young age since her mother became history when she disappeared which is probably considered as killed by poachers.
 
Ranthambore National Park [1]

Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park is one of the largest and most famous national parks in northern India. It is situated in Sawai Madhopur district of southeastern Rajasthan, about 130 km from Jaipur, which is also the nearest airport. The nearest town and railway station is at Sawai Madhopur, about 11 km away.

Ranthambhore was established as the Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by the Government of India, and was declared one of the Project Tiger reserves in 1973. Ranthambhore became a national park in 1980. In 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries.

Ranthambore wildlife sanctuary is famous for its tigers and is one of the best places in India to see these majestic predators in the jungle. Tigers can be easily spotted even during the day Time. Good time to visit Ranthambore National park is in November and May when the nature of the dry deciduous forests makes sightings common. Its deciduous forests were once a part of the magnificent jungles of Central India.

The park lies at the edge of a plateau, and is bounded to the north by the Banas River and to the south by the Chambal River. There are several lakes in the park. It is named for the historic Ranthambhore fortress, which lies within the national park. The park covers an area of 392 km², and is famous for its tiger population, and is one of India's Project Tiger reserves. Other major wild animals include the tiger, leopard, nilgai, dhole, wild boar, sambar, hyena, sloth bear and chital. It is also home to wide variety of trees, plants, birds and reptiles. Ranthambore is also the site for one of the largest banyan trees in India.

Ranthambhore is most famous for its large tiger population. As tourism in the park increased, so did the population of neighbouring villages. This led to increasing amounts of fatal human-tiger interactions and poaching. The Indian Government started Project Tiger in 1972 with an allotted area of 60 mi2. It was later expanded to become what is now called, the Ranthambhore National Park. Besides tigers, the reserve has thriving bird population with more than 270 different species of birds here.

In 2005, there were 26 tigers living in Ranthambhore. This was significantly lower than the recorded tiger population of the reserve in 1982, which then stood at 44. According to non-government sources the number of tigers in the Ranthambhore National Park were 34 in 2008. In 2008, more than 14 tiger cubs were also recorded. This was largely attributed to sustained efforts by forest officials to curb poaching. Villagers in the region were being given incentives to stay out of the park and surveillance cameras were also fitted across the reserve. The Indian government also committed US$153 million for the efforts. These efforts have been successful with Ranthambhore having enough tigers to participate in the Sariska Tiger Reserve relocation efforts.[2]

 

 

Ranthambhore in Rajasthan is an ancient fort and hunting grounds of the Maharajahs, since converted to a National Park. The villagers around earn their livelihood by showing, protecting, painting & celebrating the tiger who is at the helm of the food chain. Despite the existence of villages all around- this ancient fort reserve is a bastion for the future of the Bengal Tiger. But the tiger numbers are reducing alarmingly.

 

SusanSharma
May 13, 2006

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References
 
1. Wikimedia Commons-Ranthambore National Park-Creative Commons Attribution License-retrieved 8/12/2009
2.  Wikipedia-Ranthambore National Park -retrieved 8/11/2009
 
 
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