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Africa Natural Wonders
Ascension Island
Pico De Fogo
Pico De Teide
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Pico De Teide
Pico De Teide, Tenerife, Canary Islands
Tenerife, Canary Islands
 
Earth's Natural Wonders in Africa
 
Elevation of Pico De Teide: 12,198 fett (3,718 m)
Height of Pico De Teide: 23,00 feet (7,000 m)
Area of Tenerife: 909 square miles (2,354 sq. km)
 
Teide without snow in summer [1]
   

 

 

Teide (Mount Teide or Pico del Teide) is a volcano and mountain on Tenerife, Canary Islands (28.27 N, 16.6 W). At 3717 m above sea level and approximately 7000 m above the adjacent sea bed, it is the highest mountain in Spain, the highest mountain in any Atlantic island, and the third largest volcano on Earth. Due to its eruptive history and location close to population centres, the volcano has been designated a Decade Volcano worthy of close study to prevent future natural disasters. It is currently dormant, having last erupted in 1909 from the subsidiary vent of Chinyero on the west slope of Teide. Other significant eruptions occurred in 1704–1706 and 1798. The summit has a number of small active fumaroles emitting hot sulfur dioxide and other gases. Further eruptions are considered likely in the future, including a risk of highly dangerous pyroclastic flows similar to those on Mount Pelée and Mount Vesuvius. Teide is a modern name given by the Spanish, the name given to the volcano was Echeyde by the native Guanches, prior to the Spanish colonization. Echeyde, in the Guanches legends, meant some sort of powerful figure leaving the volcano that could turn into hell. At Centuries XVIII and XIX it was called Mount Pico too. That is the reason for the existence of Mons Pico at the Moon, in Montes Teneriffe (by side of Mare Imbrium).[3]

   
Pico de Teide from Cañada de los Guancheros at 2050 m at the northeast edge of the caldera. The yellowish foreground is pumice gravel, with Retama del Teide shrubs. Cloud blowing in on the northeast trade wind is normal between about 1,000–2,000 m altitude; here, the very top of the cloud evaporates rapidly as it enters the warm, dry, sun-heated caldera. Note also the thawing winter snow cover on the upper slopes. Photo early April.
Pico de Teide from Cañada de los Guancheros[2]
 

 

At sunrise the triangular shadow of the Pico De Teide extends 124 miles across the Atlantic Ocean and thus form the world's longest shadow. The mountain is a snow-capped volcano that dominated Tenerife in the Canary islands. It has two craters, the more recent cone-shaped peak sitting inside a caldea created by earlier activity. The new crater is 100 feet deep and sulfurous gasestill seep out from its floor. In 1705, an eruption from this crater buried the port of Garachio with ash and lava. Then in 1909, a vent on its side produced a three mile long stream of lava that flowed down its northwest slopes toward villages on the coast. The volcano was known to the original inhabitants of Tenerife as "The Peak of Hell." [3]

   
Today visitors can approach the mountain by road, and a cable car takes people to within a half-hour's steep zigzag walk through a barren lava field to the crater. On the way, walkers pass an ice filled crevasse known as the Cuevo del Hielo, and have views of the neighboring volcano Pico Viego.
snow-capped summit of Teide
 
 
The snow-capped summit of Teide in December 2004[4]

Pico de Teide, officially the highest mountain in Spain, is actually on Tenerife in the Canary Islands. It is a popular tourist destination since there is a cable car most of the way up. Although it would be perfectly possible to walk up from sea level over two or three days, most walkers, like those riding the cable car, will commence their ascent from the crater of Las Cañadas at an altitude of about 2350m. The path starts about 3km east of the cablecar station, starting as a rough road and then steepening in zigzags to reach the Refugio de Altavista which was locked when we were there even though it was August. The next landmark is a cave, really just a crevasse in the lava, on the right of the path which is filled with ice even in the height of summer. The path winds up through moonscape lava fields and eventually swings across to the top station of the cablecar where you join the masses on quite a steep ascent to the top.[3]

Sunrise 7/2/2008 on the vulcano 'Pico de Teide' Tenerife.

 

astrange0
February 17, 2008

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References
 
1. Wikimedia Commons-Pico De Teide-retrieved 6/28/2009
2. Wikimedia Commons-Pico De Teide--retrieved 6/28/2009
3. .Nationmaster Encyclopedia-Pico De Teide--retrieved 6/28/2009  
4. Wikimedia Commons-Pico De Teide--retrieved 6/28/2009
  Wikipedia  text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

 

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